Eurozone in Crisis – Which Parties Benefit from the Financial Crises?

The Eurozone gets through the heaviest financial and political crises since the end of Cold War.
But how does this financial and economic crisis affect the political parties within the eurozone and those of the other EU27?
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Austria: The anti-Euro party Team Stronach was found in 2012 by former Magna-chief Frank Stronach. Today the party is not just a member of the Nationalrat, because other Members of Parliament left their former party, but also in some Landtags. In national polls the party gets 11 per cent, while it did not contest in the last national federal election.

Belgium: The Flemish northern part of Belgium residents a separatist EFA-party the N-VA. It thinks that an independent Flemish part of Belgium would get stronger than in the status quo, so they favor independence and want to leave the southern part of Belgium, who is economically poorer than the North alone.  Within the financial crisis, in which the Northern part not just had to pay more for Wallonia but also for Southern European states, this pro-European party rose from 16 to 25.5 per cent.

Cyprus: No numbers before October 2012 avaible.

Estonia: The PES in Estonia would be the greatest profiteer if general elections would have been hold in March 2013. Since October 2009 they rose from 12 to 26 per cent. It would be the largest party in the country. They are strongly pro-European.

Finland: The True Fins believe that would be better for their country to leave the Euro and the EU at all. When the European debt crises started the party got 7.5 per cent; today 17.5 per cent of all valid voters in Finland would vote for the right-populist party.

France: The are no good numbers about the French parties in the poll at the moment, but the elections in 2012 showed the the EL-party GAUCHE was pretty strong with 12 per cent. After new elected French president Hollande moved to the political centre this mass is expected to have grown. They are EU-sceptic.

Germany: There is a good economic situation in Germany at the moment and the two large ruling parties of the EPP (CDU and CSU) of Angela Merkel profit from it in polls. In 2009 the parties reached together just 34 per cent in the federal national election, today they would get 39 per cent. But the people are also more and more content with other non-populist German parties like the PES-party SPD and the EGP-party GRÜNE.

Greece: The EL-SYRIZA-movement is one of the largest profiteers of the European debit crisis. At the start of the crises in October 2009 4.5 per cent of the voters favored this party. Today 28.5 per cent of the Greek people would vote for this party. It would be the largest party in the country. If there were general elections today, this party would rule Greece.

Ireland: The EL-party Sinn Feín that is euro-sceptic rose from 10 per cent in February 2011 to 20,5 per cent in March 2013. It is against the austerity measures.

Italy: The probably most known political profiteer of the European debt crises is topically Beppe Grillo and his party MS5. It appear on the polls in March 2010 and would get 27 per cent if there were general elections held today in Italy. This is an enormous boost for a party which is comparable with the rise of Hitler in Germany at the end of the 1930ies, although of course the both political ideologies differ extremely. It would be the largest party in the country. MS5 is against the euro and especially against the politicians of the EPP.

Luxemburg: The economy of Luxemburg has been resistant against the crisis and the people are content with their government. The pro-European EPP in Luxembourg would get 47 per cent if there were general elections held today.

Malta: Pushed by high costs of living the former opposition party PES in Malta under newly elected Prime Minister Gonzi reached the largest victory for a party in self-ruled Malta ever. The party got 55 per cent in the general election of this month. The party is strongly pro-European.

Netherlands: The most exotic profiteer of the disenchanted with politics hereafter the debt crises in the Dutch pensioner’s party 50PLUS. They appeared in the 2011 Dutch local election with 2.5 per cent and would get 11.5 per cent today.

Portugal: The most hard hit countries in Europe by debt crisis have growing leftist parties. Also in Portugal, but the growing party is a left-green party CDU: In February 2011just 7 per cent would have voted for the party in general elections. Today there are even 12 per cent for this party. The party is EU-sceptic.

Slovenia: No numbers after January 2013 avaible.

Slovakia: No numbers before October 2012 avaible.

Spain: In Spain two small parties profit from the crisis which are the EL-party IU and the UPyD. Together they got 8 per cent in October 2011, while they would get 23.5 per cent today in polls, while the major political parties PP (EPP) and the PSOE (PES) shrinked from 78 to 54 per cent. The IU is EU-sceptic, the UPyD is strongly pro-European.   

One thought on “Eurozone in Crisis – Which Parties Benefit from the Financial Crises?

  1. […] Belgium: The Flemish northern part of Belgium residents a separatist EFA-party the N-VA. It thinks that an independent Flemish part of Belgium would get stronger than in the status quo, so they favor independence and want to leave the southern part of Belgium, who is economically poorer than the North alone. Within the financial crisis, in which the Northern part not just had to pay more for Wallonia but also for Southern European states, this pro-European party rose from 16 to 25.5 per cent.  […]

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